Category Archives: FAQ

Pictures Say A 1,000 Words: Matilda

The Renaissance first opened in 1928. It has seen the Great Depression of 1929, the Great Recession of 2008, and It weathered the storm of becoming an X-rated movie house in 1979 resulting in closure due to public outcry.

The Renaissance Theatre originally open as the Ohio Theatre.

The Renaissance Theatre originally opened as the Ohio Theatre.

The Renaissance (like ALL not-for-profit performing arts organizations) is now facing its greatest challenge in the history of its existence with COVID-19. Over 60% of our operational budget comes from ticket revenue, and with doors closed we are currently at zero. However, all of us here at the Renaissance have hope. We have hope that soon this pandemic will be under control and our doors will once again be open to provide our community first-rate performances. No matter what genre of the performing arts you love, we have it – Broadway, Symphony, Country through Rock, Comedy –  we will bring it back to you!!

This blog is the first of many called “Pictures Say A 1,000 Words.” We are releasing these twice a week with pictures from this season’s performances with hope they will remind you of the wonderful experiences of the past, and hope for more in the near future.

First up is our 2019 summer musical, Roald Dahl’s Matilda. We can’t thank Jeff Sprang of Jeff Sprang Photography enough for these pictures, and all of the photography from our shows!

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Message from our President

In accordance with Governor Mike Dewine’s March 12th Executive Order, we have postponed the following events and are working to reschedule:

  • Rock of Ages, March 14th and 15th

  • Mansfield Symphony Orchestra “Mash-Up” concert on March 21st

  • Mansfield Symphony Youth Strings “Spring Concert” on March 22nd

  • Neos’ Carmina Burana on March 28th

  • Daniel Tiger Live! April 2nd

Information on the rescheduled dates for these performances will be distributed as soon as it becomes available. We are cognizant of the impact that cancelling or postponing an event has on our patrons, particularly those who may not be able to attend a rescheduled event. With this in mind,  patrons who have purchased tickets to a cancelled or postponed event will be contacted directly by a member of our Box Office staff to discuss their options.

As a not-for-profit organization, we rely heavily on ticket revenue to support over 60% of our operationsso we do not take the decision to cancel or postpone performances lightly. There is no doubt that the cancellation of this month’s performances will put a significant financial strain on the Renaissance. In addition, as a professional producer, orchestra, and venue, the effect of changing our schedule is far-reaching: the cancellation of just the two weekends listed above represents the loss of a paycheck for 89 performing artists. 

“Creativity takes courage,” Matisse said. These are challenging times for all of us. In the midst of it, we see the opportunity to come together (but at a safe distance!) and show the true power of the arts, and we’ll be doing just that in the coming days. Stay tuned to our social media pages for this exclusive content.

Despite the challenges presented by the current pandemic, providing a safe environment for our patrons, performers, volunteers, and staff is always a top priority for the Renaissance – even more so today. We remain committed to upholding the highest standards in every arena and grounded in our mission to provide the enduring power of arts entertainment and education to our community.  Like so many others, we are taking this unprecedented situation one day at a time, so it is our hope that no further cancellations will need to occur, and that “the show will go on” sooner rather than later! 

Thank you for your support, and we look forward to seeing you soon.

Chelsie Thompson, President, Renaissance Performing Arts

StaffPhoto_Chelsie(Profile-Web)

Family Four Pack

All About the Family Four Pack!

by Colleen Cook

It’s a part of our organization’s mission to ensure that everyone has access to live arts and entertainment, and we’re committed to finding new ways to expand our reach each season. At the same time, we have a responsibility to our donors and sponsors to steward their gifts well and to be a financially sustainable organization – that means, we have to be affordable and accessible, but we usually can’t make our tickets free.

Finding an affordable price point for each of our shows that fulfills our artist agreements, ensures that our expenses are covered, and maintains affordability to our patrons can be more than a little bit tricky. We subsidize every ticket price with approximately 50% donated/sponsored funds (that is to say, without the support of our donors and sponsors, we’d be forced to charge twice as much for every ticket to simply break even).

All of those factors played into our decision to create a Family Four Pack ticket option this season. The Family Four Pack is essentially 4 seats and two popcorns for $50. These seats are available in our Section C for most of our family-friendly shows beginning in the 17-18 Season. Family Four Pack tickets are not available for sale online, and can only be purchased through visiting or calling the Box Office at (419) 522-2726 during open hours, Tuesday through Friday, 12-5 PM.

When you purchase a Family Four Pack, your family can easily afford to bring the whole crew to a show without draining the college savings account. If you need more than four tickets, you can add additional tickets to your package for just $15 each. When you pick up your tickets either at the Box Office when you purchase or at the will call window the day of the event, you will have two vouchers for popcorn that you can redeem at the concession stand anytime that evening.

We hope that this new price point will make attending our shows more affordable for families and increase your opportunities to enjoy great performances here in Mansfield! We’d love to hear your thoughts – reach out in the comment section, or give our Box Office a call any time!

Web_Renaissance-Theatre-photo-by-Jeff-Sprang

A First-Timer’s Guide to Going to the Theatre

by Colleen Cook

You’ve got your tickets, your date is set and that squirmy feeling sets in – you know, the “I’m-about-to-do-something-new-and-don’t-want-to-feel-out-of-place” feeling. Leave the antacids in the medicine cabinet, we’ve got your back. After all, we all go to the theatre for the first time once! While we do our best to be a welcoming place for everyone, there are a few customs you might want to be aware of and a few tips for being a pro-audience member that can be helpful in making you feel comfortable enough to enjoy the show at your leisure.

Before we get into our tips & tricks, here are a few terms we’ll be using that you may want to be familiar with:

GLOSSARY

Orchestra – The ground level of seating.
Balcony – The higher tier of seating.
House – The part of the theatre where audiences sit.
Intermission – Theatre’s version of halftime. Most shows have a ten to 15-minute intermission.
Box Office – The part of our theatre where you purchase tickets. Ours is located at the front of our building.
Will Call – The part of the Box Office you visit to pick up your pre-purchased tickets. Our Will Call window is located inside the theatre lobby walkthrough between the new and historic lobbies.

Before You Get to the Theatre

  1. Plan to arrive about 20-30 minutes before a showtime. This allows adequate time to park your vehicle, enter the building, purchase concessions, and pickup or purchase tickets, and use the restroom. For shows that are sold out or close to selling out, you may want to plan another 10-15 minutes more.
  2. Dress in layers. In the summer when the air conditioning is on, the theatre may feel a little cool to you, and may feel too warm to you in the winter when the heat is running. Our building is very large and it’s impossible to please everyone with a thermostat setting, so plan accordingly.
  3. Speaking of dress, we don’t have a dress code! We regularly see a wide range of casual clothes (jeans and t-shirts) to formalwear (tuxedos and ballgowns). If you want to make a statement with your clothes, a night at the theatre is a great time to do that! If you prefer to blend in with the crowd, a good general rule is to wear what you might wear for a nice dinner out. For country and rock concerts and comedy shows, our audience tends to dress even more casually.
  4. Order your tickets in advance. For many of our shows, we have tickets available at the door, but that’s not always the case. There are three ways to do this: visit our Box Office (open Tuesday through Friday from 12-5), call during those same hours (419) 522-2726, or purchase online anytime at MansfieldTickets.com. (There’s a small fee for online sales from our ticketing company, which we don’t charge via phone or in person).

When You Get to the Theatre

  1. Entrance doors are at the front of the theatre on Park Avenue and at the rear from the parking lot on Third Street. We have a coat check inside the theatre if you’re coming on a cold night.
  2. Choose the right line. If you’ve already purchased your tickets but don’t have them in hand, you don’t need to visit our box office at the front of the theatre, and can instead simply visit our Will Call window, where you’ll be asked for the name the tickets were purchased under. Pro-tip: have your order confirmation number handy in case there’s any issue with picking up your tickets.
  3.  Visit the restroom. We have men’s and women’s restrooms located adjacent to our lobby area, and family restrooms located in the back corner of the lobby across from coat check. It’s recommended that you visit before the show begins so you don’t need to miss a moment of the performance! Pro-tip: Our family restrooms have a changing table available and the toilets manually flush.
  4. Look for the volunteers in red vests. Once you begin to enter the house for seating, our volunteer ushers and ticket takers will guide you to your seat. Each member of our Encore League volunteer corps wears a red vest so you can find them quickly.

Once You’re Seated

  1. Your program is your guide to the show. Think of it like a roadmap to what you’ll be experiencing. The program will probably include a letter from the director, a listing of songs or scenes, information about the performers, and acknowledgments to the individuals who made the show possible (staff, volunteers, donors, sponsors, creators, and local businesses). Don’t miss your opportunity to read through it while the lights are up, because it will add to your experience.
  2. Silence your phone. There’s nothing more distracting than notifications and ringtones interrupting a show. Don’t be “that guy.”
  3. No photos or videos. There are a few exceptions to this rule, and we’ll let you know in our curtain speech before the show begins if this show is one of them. Even if people around you are taking photos, it’s best to refrain. Besides – your photos won’t be nearly as good as the real experience. Engage and enjoy (not through a screen).

During and After the Show

  1. Sit back and enjoy! This is what you’ve been waiting for – soak it all in! For most shows, it’s best to sit back in your seat so everyone has a clear sight-line to the stage. (The exception is on occasion, some of our live concerts encourage the audience to stand. When in doubt, sit back and relax).
  2. When should I applaud? It’s customary to applaud after a musical number and at the end of an act. At a concert, the audience will also applaud when the performer comes on stage. There are a few other applause cues for a symphony concert which you can read about here.
  3. Stay quiet through the performance. Aside from a ringing cell phone, talking during a performance is the most distracting offense of theatre etiquette. If you’re attending with a young child, it’s a good idea to arrive early and explain the story to your little one before the show starts. Challenge them to the quiet game: While the lights are off, we can’t make any sound! If you’re attending a show with music you know and love, that’s great! But, save the sing-a-long for the car ride or your next karaoke night. (Sometimes at a concert, the performer will encourage the audience to sing along, and that’s the exception to this rule).
  4. While you’re in the theatre, keep your feedback on the performance neutral or positive.  Everyone is entitled to their opinion, however our audience is probably filled with people who have worked hard to make this performance happen or have a loved one who is a part of the show. If, however, you have a concern or problem, find a staff member or volunteer and they will be thrilled to help you find a solution.

We’re so glad to have you as a part of our audience, thank you for choosing us. We hope this visit is the first of many to come! And, if we didn’t answer some of our questions, feel free to call our Box Office at (419) 522-2726 or message us on Facebook.

Mansfield Symphony Cellist photo by Jeff Sprang Photography

What to Expect When You Come to the Symphony

by Colleen Cook and Chelsie Thompson

Something we hear from our patrons a lot is that one of the reasons they hesitate to come to a symphony concert is because, well, they just don’t know what to expect. Doing new things can be intimidating, especially if your perception of the experience is outside of your comfort zone.

So, here are some answers to some of the frequently asked questions about attending a symphony concert:

What should I expect?

Expect that you’re in for a treat! If this is your very first symphony concert, you might be a little nervous because this is all new to you, but that’s okay – you’ll soon realize that your role as an audience member is one of the best: to sit back, relax, and enjoy the experience. After all, the orchestra is playing this concert for you.

What should I be paying attention to?

Notice the beat of the music, and the way the tunes make you feel.Let your thoughts go, and instead, allow yourself to simply focus on what you hear. For just a couple of hours, you can pretend that there is nothing else in the world except the musical moment that you are experiencing at the time.
Here are a few things to look for:

    • The bows that the string sections use to play will always be moving in the same direction within their section.
    • Woodwinds will be adjusting their instruments and reeds, perhaps changing out their instrument to a smaller or larger model to play higher or lower notes.
    • The percussionists will be moving from instrument to instrument and changing the mallets that they use to play each one, with the timpanist occasionally tapping the drums lightly while holding his ear to them to make sure they are in tune.
    • The brass will be emptying their spit valves – yes, this happens, although any brass player will confirm to you that the “spit” is actually condensation that builds up in the instrument as they blow air through it. The French horns will be the most noticeable in this, as they are notorious for annoying their fellow brass players by purposely emptying up to ten slides in a row.
    • After solos, you might see the string players tap their bows lightly on their stand or the wind players tap their foot on the ground, or hand on their knee, to show their appreciation to the soloist during the music.

What do I wear?

Well, what do you like to wear? There’s no dress code for the symphony, so you’ll see everything from jeans and tees to cocktail dresses and suits. Going to the symphony is all about experiencing the magic of a live orchestra, so you might even notice that the orchestra dresses in all black so as not to draw your attention away from the music. Wear something that’s comfortable to you, and feel free to dress up as you see fit.

Where do I park?

You’re in luck – the Renaissance Theatre, which is the Mansfield Symphony’s home, has its own large parking lot, which connects directly to the back main entrance of the theatre (you can’t miss it – you’ll see four glass doors marked “Theatre Entrance” on your right as you walk towards the building). On busy nights, you may end up in one of our secondary lots: the two adjacent lots just West of the Ren on Park Avenue, and the gravel lot behind the main parking lot, next to the Sons of Italy building. You might also find parking on the streets in front of and behind the theatre.

Will it be interesting to watch?

There’s quite a bit going on during a symphony concert, which can have anywhere from 60 to 100 musicians onstage, so there’s plenty to see – in fact, when we add the chorus, the number of musicians onstage at one time can reach 170! The conductor is in command of all of these musicians at once, so his arms, hands, and the rest of his body are perpetually in motion to make sure that everyone is always on the same page.The musicians themselves are enjoying the music, too, so you’ll see some who are smiling, some with looks of intense concentration, and some moving to the beat.

Will I know any of the songs?

You might! You’ll probably know some of the music, and some of it will likely be new to you. Even if you don’t think that you are familiar with orchestral or classical music, chances are good that you hear it on a daily basis – it’s in commercials, movies, and in the background of radio ads. Since music speaks for itself, it’s used quite frequently to convey a mood or elicit an emotion in these formats. In fact, even current pop and hip-hop music often uses familiar melodies from classical pieces. Don’t believe us? Check out this list of just 25 of them on ClassicFM. (In case it isn’t obvious, our personal favorite is Nas + Beethoven).

Who are the musicians?

The Mansfield Symphony is an exceptional group of professional musicians from right here in Mansfield, as well as Cleveland, Columbus, and everywhere in between. They are professional musicians, music teachers, graphic designers, college professors, managerial professionals, and even music students who are currently completing their Bachelor’s, Master’s, and Doctoral degrees. They are all different in many ways, but one thing they have in common is that they love to play music for you, the audience.

Will anyone be singing?

We have a fantastic chorus, and they do accompany the orchestra on a few different occasions each year – the Holiday Pops is a perennial favorite, and we often perform at least one additional large-scale work each year that features our talented vocalists. In addition, the Mansfield Symphony Chorus is active in the community, performing an annual “Sing Out! Choral Extravaganza” with several area schools each fall – and this year, the chorus will perform their inaugural “Sing into Spring” concert in April. Shameless plug: if you love to sing, then this is the group for you!

Can I bring my children? Will they like it?

Children are always welcome at the symphony, but you’ll find that some concerts are better than others. Many regular season symphony concerts are almost two hours long, which can be hard for the little ones to sit through without getting antsy and distracting your fellow audience members and musicians. Concerts with lots of extra action onstage (like the Holiday Pops concerts)are a great first symphony experience for the family, as the multimedia and interactive aspects offer more to catch kids’ eyes and keep them engaged.

You can also give us a call to ask whether a specific concert might be okay for kids – we can give you some insight on the music and length of the concert that may help you make your decision. And if you’re still not sure, why not try out our interactive Teddy Bear Concerts with members of the Mansfield Symphony? These concerts are slated for afternoons three times each season, and offer a small group or soloist from the MSO accompanying an original story or children’s activity.

When should I clap?

Okay, this is a very common question, with good reason! After all, no one wants to be “that guy” that clapped at the wrong time. There are a few easy spots to remember:

  • At the beginning of the concert, the Concertmaster (a.k.a. the first chair violin) will enter the stage to tune the orchestra. As he or she enters, clap to welcome him or her.
  • When the orchestra is done tuning and the Concertmaster sits down, the Conductor will enter the stage, so you’ll clap to welcome him or her as well.
  • If there is a soloist, they will enter the stage when the orchestra is ready to play their piece, and the audience claps at that time.

It is also appropriate to applaud at the end of each piece – and this can be a little tricky, since some of the songs you’ll hear have multiple parts, which are called “movements.” The movements are listed in the program, and the orchestra and conductor prefer that the audience does not clap between movements, as they need that time to concentrate on the next part of their music.

A good rule of thumb is to watch the conductor: the conductor will turn around when it’s time to applaud. If the conductor’s hands are still in the air, or is still facing the orchestra, then most likely they’re still concentrating and need quiet. When the conductor’s hands drop, and he or she turns to face the audience, the orchestra is ready to hear your appreciation and applause. If ever in doubt, just hang back a bit – regular symphony-goers will help you know what to do by starting the applause at the right time.

How do I buy tickets?

Easy-peasy: you can purchase tickets through the Renaissance Box Office by calling (419) 522-2726, or visiting in person. The Box Office is open 12-5 Tuesday through Friday, and 2 hours before every show, but you can purchase online anytime.

We hope this is a helpful guide for any symphony-goer. Did we miss your question? Comment below and we’ll happily answer you! If you’d like to see what performances are upcoming in our Mansfield Symphony’s season, you can find that out right here.